Restoring Life to Learning

I’m a sucker for analogies and metaphors! I must say I hated them when I was in high school as my logical-mathematical brain craved “just tell me what it is and what it means!” Yet, as I matured as a learner and thinker, the value of analogies and metaphors (yes, even in math) steadily increased. To that end, please indulge my thinking and pondering on schools and learning using the idea of CPR (yes, I am also giving in to educators’ love of acronyms and alliteration!).

CPR- cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. How might this connect? What comes to mind? Immediately, I think of someone in trouble or crisis. Some would say that is where schools are. I also think of someone needing the help of others who are trained to help. Some would say that is where schools are. I also think of someone not surviving without it. Isn’t that where schools are?

Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation is defined as an emergency procedure for reviving heart and lung function, involving special physical techniques and often the use of electrical and mechanical equipment. Are you beginning to see the connections? It brings life back to someone who has stopped breathing and whose heart has stopped functioning. So, CPR revives the breath and the flow of blood of a body using a connection between one and another, a process, and tools.

So what kind of CPR do schools need? Schools themselves may not need CPR (I think they do), but what happens in schools is in dire need. Those of us who work in schools need to be well-trained in CPR. Without going into an in-depth review of all of the writing out there about learning and schools, I offer the following. Life can be restored to learning through:

C: Creativity, Curiosity, Collaboration, Curation, Critical Thinking, Communication (the blood flow)

P: Passion, Purpose, Play (the breath of life)

R: Reflection, Relationships (the art of reviving)

Have you had your CPR training yet? How will you use it?

 

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